Homestead

Monday, November 13, 2017

How to Plan for he Unforeseen


The New York Times published an article by Paul Sullivan entitled, "How to Plan for the Unforeseen" (Oc 08, 2017). Provided below is a brief summary of the article published at nytimes.


Read more . . .


Wednesday, November 1, 2017

3 Reasons You'll Still Need Estate Planning Even if the Death Tax Disappears


The Motley Fool published an article by Dan Caplinger entitled, "3 Reasons You'll Still Need Estate Planning Even if the Death Tax Disappears" (Oct 21, 2017). Provided below is a brief summary of the article published at fool.
Read more . . .


Monday, June 19, 2017

When you should establish an IRA as a trust


Financial-Planning.com published an article by Ed Slott entitled, "When you should establish an IRA as a trust" (May 31, 2017). Provided below is a brief summary of the article published at Financial-Planning.
Read more . . .


Monday, March 6, 2017

PLANNING MATTERS: Why you need an Estate Plan


Wickedlocal.com published an article by Leanna Hamill entitled, "PLANNING MATTERS: Why you need an Estate Plan" (Feb 7, 2017). Provided below is a brief summary of the article published at Wickedlocal.
Read more . . .


Monday, February 20, 2017

Proper Estate Planning More Than Just Documents


Poughkeepsiejournal.com published an article by Bernard A. Krooks entitled, 


Read more . . .


Sunday, August 23, 2015

Five Key Asset Protection Exemptions for Florida residents

  1. The Florida Homestead:  no dollar limitation, if within municipality ½ acre; outside municipality 160 acres. Fla Const. Art X, Sect 4
  2. Life Insurance: The cash surrender value of policy is exempt from insured’s creditors. Note: Without the proper planning death benefits may be reached based on how the proceeds are dispersed. Fla. Stat. § 222.14
  3. Annuities: The cash surrender value of policy is exempt from insured’s creditors. Fla. Stat. § 222.14
  4. Qualified Plans, IRA’s and Pension: Fully exempt if federal requirements are meet. Fla. Stat. § 222.21. Note: Fla Stat § 222.21 is being updated to also protected inherited IRAs
  5. Prepaid Tuition and Medical Savings Accounts: Fla. Stat. §222.22.

For a complete list of exemptions contact the LegalJourney Law Firm or visit the Online Sunshine

Note: LegalJourney Blog posts are designed to provide informational summaries, but do not include all aspects, issues, statutes or legal rulings. If you have additional questions based on what you read on the LegalJourney Blog, please contact the LegalJourney Law Firm or seek the advice of another qualified Florida attorney.

 


Tuesday, March 4, 2014

When to Involve Adult Children in the Estate Planning Process

Individuals who are beginning the estate planning process may assume it's best to have their adult child(ren) join them in the initial meeting with an estate planning attorney, but this may cause more harm than good.

This issue comes up often in the estate planning and elder law field, and it's a matter of client confidentiality. The attorney must determine who their client is- the individual looking to draft an estate plan or their adult children- and they owe confidentiality to that particular client.

The client is the person whose interests are most at stake. In this case, it is the parent. The attorney must be certain that they understand your wishes, goals and objectives. Having your child in the meeting could cause a problem if your child is joining in on the conversation, which may make it difficult for the attorney to determine if the wishes are those of your child, or are really your wishes.

Especially when representing elderly clients, there may be concerns that the wishes and desires of a child may be in conflict with the best interests of the parent. For example, in a Medicaid and long-term care estate planning context, the attorney may explain various options and one of those may involve transferring, or gifting, assets to children. The child's interest (purely from a financial aspect) would be to receive this gift. However, that may not be what the parent wants, or feels comfortable with. The parent may be reluctant to express those concerns to the attorney if the child is sitting right next to the parent in the meeting.

Also, the attorney will need to make a determination concerning the client's competency. Attorneys are usually able to assess a client's ability to make decisions during the initial meeting. Having a child in the room may make it more difficult for the attorney to determine competency because the child may be "guiding" the parent and finishing the parents thoughts in an attempt to help. 

The American Bar Association has published a pamphlet on these issues titled "Why Am I Left in the Waiting Room?" that may be helpful for you and your child to read prior to meeting with an attorney. 


Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Top 5 Overlooked Issues in Estate Planning

In planning your estate, you most likely have concerned yourself with “big picture” issues. Who inherits what? Do I need a living trust? However, there are numerous details that are often overlooked, and which can drastically impact the distribution of your estate to your intended beneficiaries. Listed below are some of the most common overlooked estate planning issues.

Liquid Cash: Is there enough available cash to cover the estate’s operating expenses until it is settled? The estate may have to pay attorneys’ fees, court costs, probate expenses, debts of the decedent, or living expenses for a surviving spouse or other dependents. Your estate plan should estimate the cash needs and ensure there are adequate cash resources to cover these expenses.

Tax Planning: Even if your estate is exempt from federal estate tax, there are other possible taxes that should be anticipated by your estate plan. There may be estate or death taxes at the state level. The estate may have to pay income taxes on investment income earned before the estate is settled. Income taxes can be paid out of the liquid assets held in the estate. Death taxes may be paid by the estate from the amount inherited by each beneficiary. 

Executor’s Access to Documents: The executor or estate administrator must be able to access the decedent’s important papers in order to locate assets and close up the decedent’s affairs. Also, creditors must be identified and paid before an estate can be settled. It is important to leave a notebook or other instructions listing significant assets, where they are located, identifying information such as serial numbers, account numbers or passwords. If the executor is not left with this information, it may require unnecessary expenditures of time and money to locate all of the assets. This notebook should also include a comprehensive list of creditors, to help the executor verify or refute any creditor claims.

Beneficiary Designations: Many assets can be transferred outside of a will or trust, by simply designating a beneficiary to receive the asset upon your death. Life insurance policies, annuities, retirement accounts, and motor vehicles are some of the assets that can be transferred directly to a beneficiary. To make these arrangements, submit a beneficiary designation form to the financial institution, retirement plan or motor vehicle department. Be sure to keep the beneficiary designations current, and provide instructions to the executor listing which assets are to be transferred in this manner.

Fund the Living Trust: Unfortunately, many people establish living trusts, but fail to fully implement them, thereby reducing or eliminating the trust’s potential benefits. To be subject to the trust, as opposed to the probate court, an asset’s ownership must be legally transferred into the trust. If legal title to homes, vehicles or financial accounts is not transferred into the trust, the trust is of no effect and the assets must be probated.


Monday, February 17, 2014

Estate Planning Don’t

Preparing for the future is an uncertain business, but there are steps you can take during your lifetime to simplify matters for your loved ones after you pass, and to ensure your final wishes are carried out. Planning for what happens to your property, or who cares for your family members, upon your death can be a complicated process. To simplify things, we’ve created the following list to help you avoid some of the pitfalls you may encounter before, or even long after, you create your estate plan.

Don’t assume you can plan your estate by yourself. Get help from an estate planning attorney whose training and experience can ensure that you minimize tax implications and simplify the process of settling your estate.

Don’t put off your estate planning needs because of finances. To be sure, there are upfront costs for establishing the estate plan; however establishing your estate plan is an investment in the future well-being of your family, and one which will result in a far greater cash savings over the long term.

Don’t make changes to your estate plan without consulting your attorney. Changes in one area of your estate plan could impact other provisions you have made, triggering legal or tax implications you never intended.

Don’t assume your children will intuitively know your wishes, and handle the situation appropriately upon your death. Money and sentimental items can cause a rift between even the most agreeable siblings, and they will be especially vulnerable as they deal with the emotional impact of your passing.

Don’t assume that once you’ve prepared your estate plan it’s set in stone. Estate planning documents regularly need to be revised, often due to a change in marital status, birth or death of a family member, or a significant change in the value of your estate. Beneficiary designations should be periodically reviewed to ensure they are up to date.

Don’t forget to notify your family members, friends or other beneficiaries of your estate plan. Make sure your executor and successor trustee have access to your end-of-life documents.

Don’t assume your spouse will handle everything if something happens to you. It’s possible your spouse may be incapacitated at the same time, for example if you both are injured in the same accident. A proper estate plan appoints alternate representatives to handle your affairs if both you and your spouse are unable to do so.

Don’t use the same person as your agent under both the financial and healthcare powers of attorney. Using the same individual gives that person an incredible amount of influence over your future and it may be a good idea to split up the decision-making authority.

Don’t forget to name alternate agents, executors or successor trustees. You may name a family member to fill one of these roles, and forget to revise the document if that person dies or becomes incapacitated. By adding alternates, you ensure there is no question regarding who has the authority to act on your or the estate’s behalf.


Archived Posts

2017
2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2015
2014
December
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2013
December
November
October
August
July
May
April
March
February
January


Attorney Karnardo Garnett represents clients with their Estate Planning, Elder Law and Asset Protection needs throughout the Tampa Bay Area, serving all of the bay area, including but not limited to Tampa, Brandon, Clearwater, St. Petersburg, Gibsonton, Riverview, Oldsmar, Safety Harbor, Hillsborough County, and Pinellas County, FL



© 2017 LegalJourney Law Firm PLLC | Disclaimer
2002 W. Cleveland St, Tampa , FL 33606
| Phone: 813.344.5769 | 888.954.5769

Estate Planning | Estate Planning - Spanish | Elder Law/Medicaid Planning | Elder Law/Medicaid Planning - Spanish | Planning for Children | Planning for Children - Spanish | Probate / Estate Administration | Probate / Estate Administration - Spanish | Estate Litigation | Estate Litigation - Spanish | Guardianships | Special Needs Planning | Estate Tax Planning | Asset Protection | Online Legal Services

Attorney Website Design by
Amicus Creative


© LegalJourney Law Firm | Disclaimer | Attorney Website Design by Zola
2002 W. Cleveland St, Tampa, FL 33606 | Phone: 813.344.5769