Social Security

Monday, June 19, 2017

When you should establish an IRA as a trust


Financial-Planning.com published an article by Ed Slott entitled, "When you should establish an IRA as a trust" (May 31, 2017). Provided below is a brief summary of the article published at Financial-Planning.
Read more . . .


Monday, December 26, 2016

Estate Planning for Special Needs


Forbes.com published an article entitled, "Estate Planning for Special Needs" (Nov 7, 2016). Provided below is a brief summary of the article from Forbes.
Read more . . .


Monday, December 12, 2016

The Most Important Estate Planning Issue Boomers Need to Address


Kelley Long (Forbes.com) published an article entitled, "The Most Important Estate Planning Issue Boomers Need to Address" (May 08, 2016). Provided below is a brief summary of the article from Forbes.
Read more . . .


Tuesday, September 2, 2014

When Boomers Inherit, Complications May Follow

Fran Hawthorne (NYTimes.com) has an article published entitled When Boomers Inherit, Complications May Follow” (Feb10, 2014). Provided below is a summary of the article from NYTimes.com:

 

When Boomers Inherit, Complications May Follow

There have never been as many heirs with as much money as now, thanks to the intersection of two demographics: the 79 million baby boomers and the general thriftiness of their Depression-raised parents.

"Inherited money is sacred money," said Rick Kagawa, 61, a financial planner in California who inherited money and property when his mother died in 2010.

"Whatever you do with that money, you should think about your parents and what they would think of what you did."

Often, as with Ms. Cornell, emotional ties make heirs reluctant to alter a penny of their parents' investment strategy or shed a single inch of property.

"We've had clients who wanted to keep a stock that was part of the family's wealth in memory of their parents, even if it's causing a lack of diversification in the portfolio," said Charles D. Haines Jr., chief executive of Kinsight, a financial advisory firm based in Birmingham, Ala., with $500 million under management.

Ms. Bradley of the Sudden Money Institute suggests that instead of trying to memorialize parents by hanging onto their stock portfolio, offspring should "Do something with the money to create a lasting memory." One client, she said, uses the interest from her inheritance to host an annual family reunion.

A picture caption on Tuesday with an article about baby boomers' inheriting their parents' estates misstated the name of the university where the photograph of a Japanese garden was taken.

To read the full article go to "When Boomers Inherit, Complications May Follow" By Fran Hawthorne (NYTimes.com).  


Friday, March 14, 2014

An Aging Population Also Poses Opportunities for Retirement Careers

Kerry Hannon (NYTimes.com) has recently published an article entitled, An Aging Population Also Poses Opportunities for Retirement Careers (March 7, 2014). Provided below is the abstract to the article from NYTimes.com:

An Aging Population Also Poses Opportunities for Retirement Careers

As the population ages, jobs like massage therapist and others like senior fitness trainers, dietitians and nutritionists, personal assistants, handymen, drivers and caterers who prepare meals for shut-ins are on the upswing.

"It's no secret that retirement is a very diverse process for older Americans, with some combination of phased retirement and bridge jobs being the norm among older career workers," according to Kevin E. Cahill, an economist with the Sloan Center on Aging and Work at Boston College.

"About 60 percent of the career workers take on a part-time job after exiting their main career," Mr. Cahill said.

As a result, more and more jobs and businesses are being created to satisfy not just the growing number of people living healthier and longer lives, but this "Aging in place" market.

FINANCIAL PLANNER Not surprisingly, as retirees fear outliving their money, jobs for personal financial advisers are expected to be one of the faster-growing occupations over the next decade, with a projected growth rate of 27 percent by 2022, according to the Labor Department.

TRAVEL GUIDE When Judi Bonilla, 56, was laid off from her job as a logistics subcontractor for the military, she did some soul-searching and came to the conclusion that she enjoyed working with older adults.

What ties these jobs together? At a time of life when someone's world begins to narrow, these services all offer a kind of independence - whether it's a way for clients to stay active socially and physically, to not worry about finances, or to get relief from the aches and anxiety of aging with a human touch.

For more information on this topic, continue reading the article "An Aging Population Also Poses Opportunities for Retirement Careers" by Kerry Hannon (NYTimes.com). 


Monday, February 10, 2014

Life Insurance and Medicaid Planning

Many people purchase a life insurance policy as a way to ensure that their dependents are protected upon their passing. Generally speaking, there are two basic types of life insurance policies: term life and whole life insurance. With a term policy, the holder pays a monthly, or yearly, premium for the policy which will pay out a death benefit to the beneficiaries upon the holder’s death so long as the policy was in effect. A whole life policy is similar to a term, but also has an investment component which builds cash value over time. This cash value can benefit either the policy holder during his or her lifetime or the beneficiaries.

During the Medicaid planning process, many people are surprised to learn that the cash value of life insurance is a countable asset. In most cases, if you have a policy with a cash value, you are able to go to the insurance company and request to withdraw that cash value. Thus, for Medicaid purposes, that cash value will be treated just like a bank account in your name. There may be certain exceptions under your state law where Medicaid will not count the cash value. For example, if the face value (which is normally the death benefit) of the policy is a fairly small amount (such as $10,000 or less) and if your "estate" is named as a beneficiary, or if a "funeral home" is named as a beneficiary, the cash value may not be counted. However, if your estate is the beneficiary then Medicaid likely would have the ability to collect the death proceeds from your estate to reimburse Medicaid for the amounts they have paid out on your behalf while you are living (this is known as estate recovery). Generally, the face value ($10,000 in the example) is an aggregate amount of all life insurance policies you have. It is not a per policy amount.

Each state has different Medicaid laws so it’s absolutely essential that you seek out a good elder law or Medicaid planning attorney in determining whether your life insurance policy is a countable asset.


Thursday, December 26, 2013

Winning Veterans’ Trust, and Profiting From It

Jessica Silver-Greenberg (NYTimes) has recently published an article entitled, “Winning Veterans’ Trust, and Profiting From It” (December 23, 2013). Provided below is the abstract to the article from NY Times:

Winning Veterans’ Trust, and Profiting From It 

As you reach a certain age, retirement planning is essential. For Henry Schaffer, a World War II veteran, there was no question that he no longer could live on his own. His daughter Kristi began searching for retirement homes and the money to pay for it.

At Aspen View, a senior living complex in Billings, Mont., a lawyer accredited by the Department of Veterans Affairs, told the family Mr. Schaffer could probably qualify for a V.A discount. The problem lies after Mr. Schaffer moved in and they learned he did not qualify for a V.A discount at all. His daughter Kristi now says he worries he will be evicted as he can only afford about half of his monthly bills.

As baby boomers head toward retirement — worrying not only about their financial futures, but also their parents’ — a cottage industry has sprung up around the pension program.

Lawyers, financial advisers and insurance brokers have formed a lucrative alliance with retirement communities and assisted living facilities to extract many billions of taxpayer dollars from the V.A., according to interviews with state and federal authorities, as well as a review by The New York Times of hundreds of legal documents and client contracts.

For more information on this topic, continue reading the article “Winning Veterans’ Trust, and Profiting From It” by Jessica Silver-Greenberg. 


Friday, March 15, 2013

Should you withdraw your Social Security benefits early?

You don’t have to be retired to dip into your Social Security benefits which are available to you as early as age 62.  But is the early withdrawal worth the costs?

A quick visit to the U.S. Social Security Administration Retirement Planner website can help you figure out just how much money you’ll receive if you withdraw early. The benefits you will collect before reaching the full retirement age of 66 will be less than your full potential amount.

The reduction of benefits in early withdrawal is based upon the amount of time you currently are from full retirement age. If you withdraw at the earliest point of age 62, you will receive 25% less than your full benefits.  If you were born after 1960, that amount is 30%. At 63, the reduction is around 20%, and it continues to decrease as you approach the age of 66.

Withdrawing early also presents a risk if you think there is a chance you may go back to work. Excess earnings may be cause for the Social Security Administration to withhold some benefits. Though a special rule is in existence that withholding cannot be applied for one year during retired months, regardless of yearly earnings, extended working periods can result in decreased benefits. The withheld benefits, however, will be taken into consideration and recalculated once you reach full retirement age.

If you are considering withdrawing early from your retirement accounts, it is important to consider both age and your particular benefits. If you are unsure of how much you will receive, you can look to your yearly statement from Social Security. Social Security Statements are sent out to everyone over the age of 25 once a year, and should come in the mail about three months before your birthday. You can also request a copy of the form by phone or the web, or calculate your benefits yourself through programs that are available online at www.ssa.gov/retire.

The more you know about your benefits, the easier it will be to make a well-educated decision about when to withdraw. If you can afford to, it’s often worth it to wait. Ideally, if you have enough savings from other sources of income to put off withdrawing until after age 66, you will be rewarded with your full eligible benefits.
 


Thursday, May 17, 2012

Online Social Security Earnings Statements

Review your Social Security earnings and benefits statements online at www.socialsecurity.gov. The Social Security Administrations online program also allows you to estimate your retirement, disability and survivors benefits.

Note: Prior to reviewing statements, users must first create an online account by going to http://www.ssa.gov/mystatement/.

 

 


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Attorney Karnardo Garnett represents clients with their Estate Planning, Elder Law and Asset Protection needs throughout the Tampa Bay Area, serving all of the bay area, including but not limited to Tampa, Brandon, Clearwater, St. Petersburg, Gibsonton, Riverview, Oldsmar, Safety Harbor, Hillsborough County, and Pinellas County, FL



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